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Police name person under investigation in Nashville bombing | Crime News

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Christmas day explosion wounded three people and damaged dozens of businesses, including an AT&T switching centre.

Nashville Police have said Anthony Quinn Warner is under investigation in connection with the Christmas Day bombing that rocked the US city of Nashville.

Metro Nashville Police Department Spokesman Don Aaron confirmed Warner’s identity on Sunday.

Federal and state investigators are trying to determine who set off a bomb inside a recreational vehicle on Friday morning, injuring three people and damaging more than 40 businesses.

They are also working to identify human remains found at the scene.

Nashville Chief of Police John Drake speaks at a news conference in Nashville, Tennessee [Mark Humphrey/AP Photo]

Meanwhile, local media reported on Sunday that FBI agents investigating the explosion visited a real estate agency where Warner had worked on computers.

Steve Fridrich, owner of Fridrich & Clark Realty in Nashville’s Green Hills neighbourhood, told the Tennessean newspaper he spoke with the agents late on Saturday about Warner, 63, after the company told the FBI he had worked there.

According to public records, Warner had lived at a home in Antioch, southeast of Nashville, that was searched on Saturday by FBI and US Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives officials following the huge Christmas Day blast.

Federal agents have said they are following up on more than 500 leads, and are working to identify what appear to be human remains found in the wreckage.

The explosion in the heart of the US country music capital wounded three people and damaged more than 40 businesses including an AT&T switching centre, disrupting mobile, internet and TV services across central Tennessee and parts of four other states.

Fridrich said that for four or five years Warner had come into the office roughly once a month to provide computer consulting services, until this month when Warner told the company in an email that he would no longer be working for them. He gave no reason, according to Fridrich.

“He seemed very personable to us – this is quite out of character, I think,” Fridrich told the newspaper.

FBI and ATF agents search the basement of a home in Nashville, Tennessee [Mark Humphrey/AP Photo]

At a news conference on Sunday, five Nashville police officers who were on the scene early on Friday recalled the dramatic moments before the explosion, as they scrambled to evacuate homes and buildings and called for a bomb squad, which was en route when the motor home blew up.

Officers had heard music and an automated announcement coming from the RV warning them about the impending explosion as they sprang into action, requesting access codes for buildings and trying to shepherd as many residents to safety as possible.

“I was thrown forward, knocked to the ground,” officer Brenna Hosey told reporters about the moment of the explosion. “But I was able to catch myself, I was fine.”

The officers, who were initially responding to reports of gunfire in the area, have been hailed as heroes by city leaders.



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Trapped China miners ask for rice porridge, sausages | China News

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Rescuers drilled three more channels on Tuesday as they race against time to extract the 22 workers.

Workers trapped in a Chinese gold mine for more than nine days have received more medical and food supplies, including bandages, blankets and rice porridge, but one of the group is in a critical condition with a severe head injury, state media said.

A total of 22 workers were left trapped in the Hushan mine, in Shandong province, after an explosion on January 10.

A week later, it emerged that at least 12 of them were still alive as a note retrieved from the mine said: “We hope the rescue won’t stop.”

A drilled channel on Sunday located 11 of the miners, who were working more than 600 metres (1,968 feet) underground and rescuers were subsequently able to speak to them via a wired telephone.

But the progress of the rescue has been slow, according to Chen Fei, a top city official.

Rescuers drilled three more channels on Tuesday in an effort to extract the trapped miners [Stringer/AFP]

“The surrounding rock near the ore body is mostly granite … that is very hard, resulting in the slow progress of the rescue,” Chen told reporters.

“There is a lot of water in the shaft that may pose a danger to the trapped workers.”

Chen said the current food supply was only enough for two days.

‘Please speed up the rescue’

Rescuers drilled three more channels on Tuesday, according to a rescue map published on the Yantai government’s official Weibo account, a Chinese version of Twitter.

More than 300 people are involved in the rescue effort and excavators and machinery are on site but the teams have warned it will be extremely difficult to bring out the miners from the tunnel’s entrance.

The official Xinhua news agency said the miners had requested on Monday evening sausage and pickles as well as porridge but medical experts decided they should not eat hard food having only just regained their strength.

Fortified by the food and medical supplies – the fourth consignment to reach the group – two workers who had previously been very weak were able to walk again on Tuesday, Xinhua reported, citing a member of the rescue team.

However, the state-run newspaper People’s Daily said one worker was in a coma and in a critical condition, after sustaining a head injury in the blast, while two were “mildly unwell” and eight in good health.

One more worker has been located in another section of the mine, while the whereabouts of the other 10 remain unknown.

News that some of the miners are still alive has boosted Chinese netizens’ hopes for a miraculous escape, with thousands leaving prayer messages on Weibo and calling on the authorities to “please speed up the rescue”.

China’s National Mine Safety Administration has ordered a comprehensive inspection of the country’s non-coal mines, which will continue until the end of March, the People’s Daily reported.

There are 32,000 non-coal mines in China, most of which are small, use outdated technology and equipment and have poor safety management, it said, citing an administration official.



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