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New book claims Trump embraces ‘cheating as a way of life’ | USA News

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A memoir by President Donald Trump’s niece due to be published next week describes the president as a pathological narcissist who cheated on the SAT college entrance examination and has embraced “cheating as a way of life” ever since, according to US media outlets who received advance copies of the book.

The book by Mary Trump, the daughter of President Trump’s elder brother, describes how decades of dysfunction and relations with an abusive father moulded the man who would become president into a reckless leader who, according to publisher Simon & Schuster, “now threatens the world’s health, economic security and social fabric”.

The Trump family has been embroiled in a legal battle to halt publication of the book – titled “Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man” – but an appellate court in the state of New York cleared it for release over the objections of Robert Trump, the president’s brother.

Robert Trump has said the book would violate a confidentiality agreement tied to the estate of his father Fred Trump Sr, who died in 1999. Mary Trump is Fred Trump’s granddaughter.

Citing “extraordinary interest” in the book, Simon & Schuster announced on Monday that the book would be released ahead of schedule, becoming available in bookstores on July 14 instead of July 28. Even before its release, the book is on Amazon’s list of top 10 best-sellers.

The New York Times newspaper, which received an advance copy, reported on Tuesday that the book claims Trump paid someone to take the SAT college entrance exam for him when he was in high school in the New York City borough of Queens. His high score on the test helped him secure a spot at the prestigious Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania.

The book also quotes President Trump’s sister, Maryanne Trump Barry, a retired federal appeals court judge, as having reservations about his fitness for office, referring to him as a “clown”. The sister also expressed amazement at support for him among evangelical Christians in the United States.

“The only time Donald went to church was when the cameras were there,” Mary Trump quotes her aunt as saying during the 2016 campaign. “It’s mind boggling. But that’s all about his base. He has no principles. None!”

 

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany on Tuesday called the memoir a “book of falsehoods”.

“It’s ridiculous, absurd allegations that have absolute no bearing in truth. Have yet to see the book, but it is a book of falsehoods,” she told reporters outside the White House.

Mary Trump, a clinical psychologist, claims the president meets all the criteria for being a narcissist, but writes that even that diagnosis does not capture the full array of his pathologies.

“The fact is,” she writes, “Donald’s pathologies are so complex and his behaviors so often inexplicable that coming up with an accurate and comprehensive diagnosis would require a full battery of psychological and neurophysical tests that he’ll never sit for.”



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Trapped China miners ask for rice porridge, sausages | China News

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Rescuers drilled three more channels on Tuesday as they race against time to extract the 22 workers.

Workers trapped in a Chinese gold mine for more than nine days have received more medical and food supplies, including bandages, blankets and rice porridge, but one of the group is in a critical condition with a severe head injury, state media said.

A total of 22 workers were left trapped in the Hushan mine, in Shandong province, after an explosion on January 10.

A week later, it emerged that at least 12 of them were still alive as a note retrieved from the mine said: “We hope the rescue won’t stop.”

A drilled channel on Sunday located 11 of the miners, who were working more than 600 metres (1,968 feet) underground and rescuers were subsequently able to speak to them via a wired telephone.

But the progress of the rescue has been slow, according to Chen Fei, a top city official.

Rescuers drilled three more channels on Tuesday in an effort to extract the trapped miners [Stringer/AFP]

“The surrounding rock near the ore body is mostly granite … that is very hard, resulting in the slow progress of the rescue,” Chen told reporters.

“There is a lot of water in the shaft that may pose a danger to the trapped workers.”

Chen said the current food supply was only enough for two days.

‘Please speed up the rescue’

Rescuers drilled three more channels on Tuesday, according to a rescue map published on the Yantai government’s official Weibo account, a Chinese version of Twitter.

More than 300 people are involved in the rescue effort and excavators and machinery are on site but the teams have warned it will be extremely difficult to bring out the miners from the tunnel’s entrance.

The official Xinhua news agency said the miners had requested on Monday evening sausage and pickles as well as porridge but medical experts decided they should not eat hard food having only just regained their strength.

Fortified by the food and medical supplies – the fourth consignment to reach the group – two workers who had previously been very weak were able to walk again on Tuesday, Xinhua reported, citing a member of the rescue team.

However, the state-run newspaper People’s Daily said one worker was in a coma and in a critical condition, after sustaining a head injury in the blast, while two were “mildly unwell” and eight in good health.

One more worker has been located in another section of the mine, while the whereabouts of the other 10 remain unknown.

News that some of the miners are still alive has boosted Chinese netizens’ hopes for a miraculous escape, with thousands leaving prayer messages on Weibo and calling on the authorities to “please speed up the rescue”.

China’s National Mine Safety Administration has ordered a comprehensive inspection of the country’s non-coal mines, which will continue until the end of March, the People’s Daily reported.

There are 32,000 non-coal mines in China, most of which are small, use outdated technology and equipment and have poor safety management, it said, citing an administration official.



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