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Plant-Based Black Bean Enchiladas – Experience Life

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DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.

Place a saucepan over medium heat and warm the avocado oil. Add the flour, cumin, and chili powder, and stir to make a paste. Cook, stirring constantly, until the mixture is fragrant, about a minute. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and tomato paste and stir to combine, then gradually add the stock, whisking constantly to break up lumps.

Continue to cook, whisking frequently, until the sauce has thickened, about eight to 10 minutes. Turn off the heat and add the lime juice.

In a 9-x-13-inch baking dish, combine the onion, zucchini, and pepper. Add the avocado oil, the remaining salt, and the oregano, and stir until coated. Cover the pan with foil and roast for 20 minutes, then uncover and roast for 20 minutes longer. Let the vegetables cool slightly, then transfer to a large bowl; wipe out and set aside the baking dish. Add the drained beans to the veggies and mix.

Wrap the tortillas in foil and warm in the oven for 10 minutes, or use a steamer basket.

Pour 3/4 cup of the sauce into a wide, low bowl. Place a tortilla in the bowl, and flip it to lightly coat each side with sauce. Place about 1/4 cup of the vegetable mixture in each tortilla, then roll it tightly and place it in the baking dish. Repeat until you have a row of enchiladas down the center of the pan, pressed tightly together. Pour remaining sauce over the rolled tortillas, covering them completely. Sprinkle with pepitas.

Cover the pan with foil and bake until bubbling, about 30 minutes. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Serve sprinkled with cilantro.

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Health & Fitness

The 4 Communication Styles – Experience Life

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How knowing these four different communication styles can improve your relationships.

When I was in seventh grade, my friends and I developed a pattern of sulking, almost on a monthly rotation. We’d take turns getting upset about something relatively minor — one friend wouldn’t call when she said she would, another would flirt with that cute boy we’d all been crushing on.

Whatever the origin of the sulk, the aggrieved party would insist, “I’m not mad.” Resolving the conflict became impossible, because no one would ever admit they were angry.

I didn’t know it at the time, but that behavior is a classic example of passive-aggressive communication — and it’s an ineffective way to get your point across.

So why do some people persist in long sighs, insincere denials, and other hallmarks of passive aggression? It’s not that they’re stuck in middle school, experts say. It’s just one of the four basic communication styles: passive, passive-aggressive, aggressive, and assertive.

Our communication style can be a powerful tool in building meaningful connections with others. Though our way of communicating may vary depending on the situation and the individual, we all tend to gravitate toward one dominant mode — and sometimes get entrenched in bad habits.

Research suggests the assertive style is the healthiest and most effective, although it’s normal to use one of the other types on occasion. When communication breaks down, it’s often because of conflicting styles.

“Communicating effectively is a good way to lower the amount of stress we’re experiencing individually and collectively,” says psychologist Randy Paterson, PhD, author of The Assertiveness Workbook. “As we think about the pain in the world, think about how much stems from people feeling profoundly alienated from one another.”

Understanding your own com­munication style — and learning how to identify the types of those around you — can foster more compassion and mutual respect in your most important relationships.

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