Connect with us

Health & Fitness

How to Buy and Store Tomatoes

Published

on

It’s one of the best times of the year: tomato season! Follow these tips to make the most of these late-summer superstars.

Shop and Store

Look for firm, brightly colored tomatoes without bruises, cracks, or wrinkles. Resist the urge to squeeze before you buy; it can damage the delicate fruit. Instead, take a whiff: It should exude an intense tomato aroma. Refrigeration will dull their bright flavor and create a mealy texture, so store ripe tomatoes at room temperature, then wash and use as soon as possible. If they need a bit more ripening, place them in a brown paper bag.

Go Local

Most tomatoes at the supermarket are high-yield varieties from Florida, Mexico, or California. They’re cultivated for easy transport and favorable appearance, not for flavor. Locally grown tomatoes are tastier and more nutritious — and they’re usually cheaper when they’re in season. Look for them at your grocery store or head to the farmers’ market to get the goods straight from the source.

Aim for Variety

Different types of tomatoes shine under different culinary circumstances. Choose small cherry and grape tomatoes for snacking or tossing in a salad; slice meaty beefsteaks for burgers or sandwiches. Firm Roma or plum tomatoes contain fewer seeds and less water than most other cultivars, making them ideal for canning or cooking into a sauce.

Be Ready

Peak tomato season is a fleeting window — mid-July to mid-September, depending on your locale — so you’ll want to be ready when they are. Heirlooms can be dazzling with just salt, pepper, and olive oil, or with fresh basil and mozzarella in a summer caprese. Gently stew diced Roma or plum tomatoes and enjoy them with poached eggs and fresh herbs. If you’re lucky enough to find yourself with a whole bushel of ripe tomatoes, try our favorite quick-preserving method here.

Source link

Continue Reading
Comments

Health & Fitness

Lentil and Mushroom Shepherd’s Pie

Published

on

DIRECTIONS

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F and lightly oil a 9-x-13-inch baking dish.

In a 2-quart pot, bring the vegetable stock and lentils to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat to medium low, cover, and cook until the lentils are tender but not falling apart, about 20 to 25 minutes. Drain the lentils and reserve the stock. Measure the stock and add water, if needed, to make a 1/2 cup.

While the lentils are cooking, place the parsnips in a second large pot and cover with water by an inch. Bring to a boil over high heat, then reduce the heat to medium and cook until the parsnips are tender when pierced, about 10 minutes. Drain, then place the parsnips in a food processor. Purée until smooth, scraping down the sides as needed. Add the nondairy milk, 1 tablespoon avocado oil, and 1 teaspoon salt, and purée to mix.

In a large skillet, warm the remaining avocado oil over medium-high heat. Add the onion and cook until it begins to sizzle, about two minutes. Reduce the heat to medium, and add the mushrooms, carrots, and remaining salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the mushrooms are shrunken and browned and other veggies are tender, about 15 minutes.

Add the thyme, sage, pepper, flour, and tomato paste. Stir until combined, then add the reserved stock from the lentils and bring to a low boil. Cook for about two minutes, then turn off the heat. Stir in the peas and cooked lentils, then scrape the mixture into the baking dish and smooth the top.

Spread the parsnip purée over the lentil mixture. Sprinkle with the paprika.

Bake until lightly browned and bubbling, about 35 minutes. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving.

Source link

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Top Stories